Radiocarbon Dating & Egyptian Chronology Symposium

17th-18th March 2010

The Research Laboratory for Archaeology and the History of Art, University of Oxford, are hosting a symposium to discuss the results of the Egyptian Chronology Project, on the 17th-18th March 2010. The meeting will be held at the Ashmolean Museum. There will also be a public lecture, followed by a drinks reception, on the evening of 17th March at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History.

The Egyptian Chronology Project has investigated synchronisms between the Egyptian historical chronology and dates that have been obtained by radiocarbon measurements. A major part of the project has been to run a new series of radiocarbon measurements on Egyptian material from collections in Europe and the USA. The project has also been developing methodologies and protocols for the sampling and analysis of archaeological materials and investigating such issues as the reservoir effect, thought to have an impact on the viability of the use of radiocarbon dating in Egypt. The chronological scope under discussion during the symposium will be that from the 1st until the 21st Dynasty.

At the symposium we will present the wider project aims and methodology, a discussion of the history of radiocarbon dating within Egypt and the importance of using radiocarbon dating for cross-pining inter-regional chronologies. The symposium will present a number of chronologically-themed sessions, including discussion of the new series of radiocarbon dates generated by the project, and scholars from the international community will present papers and act as discussants at the meeting. Please see:

Conference schedule

for more details. In addition to the main conference sessions there is also a public lecture on the evening of the 17th March with a reception afterwards.

Registration

Registration is now open at the Oxford University Online Store and will cost 50 (25 for students), including lunch, teas and coffees on both days, plus entry to the lecture and drinks reception on the evening of 17th March. Please note that spaces are limited.

Any enquiries, and to register your interest for the public lecture on the evening of 17th March 2010, can be sent to:

egyptian.chronology@rlaha.ox.ac.uk

Acknowledgements

We are very grateful to the Leverhulme Trust for funding the research that led to this symposium and for the British Academy for funding the symposium itself.